22 Sep 2020 | Next Salah Time: Fajr at 04:55

I visited the Prophet during his ailments and he was suffering from a high fever. I said, "You have a high fever. Is it because you will have a double reward for it?" He said, "Yes, for no Muslim is afflicted with any harm but that Allah will remove his sins as the leaves of a tree fall down."

Narrated 'Abdullah:

Today's Prayer Timetable

Prayer Start Jama'at
Fajr 04:55 06:30
Dhuhr 13:03 13:45
Asr 17:09 18:00
Maghrib 19:13 19:13
Isha 21:10 21:30

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Posted on: 19 Apr 2012 Tagged by:

galloping-horse-paintings-04


When observing a galloping horse, one cannot help but recognise it’s elegance and beauty and the image of it running through glorious scenery is very often used as a symbol of freedom. The horse is a graceful creature, and there has been many a heart-wrenching story surrounding man’s complicated relationship with his horse, such as Black Beauty, and the more recent,War Horse. The use of the horse to man through the ages has been diverse, with it being used for farming, horseback riding, pulling carriages and goods, and as a vehicle in warfare. It is arguably one of the few animals that you can pluck from the wild, and fully domesticate with systematic and laborious training. In Islamic spirituality, it is often used as a symbol for the reining in of the ego (nafs­). In the same way that one would train a horse, bring it under control and have it respond to commands of the hand and heel, we are to attain control over our desires and bring into moderation bestial desires to oversleep and overeat.

Once again, the Grand National has dominated the headlines and split national opinion as two horses were put down due to their injuries during the race. Is using animals for sport cruel? Does horseracing unnecessarily endanger the lives of horses, or is it just like all the risks we face in day to day life? Should we accept that animals will die, or should more be done to tackle the hazards?

Horses by their nature are not made for a solitary and still barn life of little action, and certainly not the racehorses that are bred for competitions like the Grand National. However, if they are to be raced, then the race courses and manner in which races are held should be as animal-friendly as possible.

Human beings are distinguished by their willpower and intellect; both of these factors bring about a certain level of responsibility to the rest of creation. Indeed, mankind are the vicegerents of God on Earth, and they have a duty to preserve the rights of other creatures. When matters are looked upon through such a lens, one begins to question the morality of all sports and entertainment that brings harm to animals. Some are calling for a complete ban on horseracing, whereas others are seeking to review the number of horses on the course, as well as pulling certain fences such as Bercher’s Brook which claimed the lives of two horses last Saturday.

Whilst the argument against boxing is just as strong – the face of the son of Adam is deemed ennobled and therefore deliberating attacking it is seen as inhumane- the argument against sports involving animals is stronger. Human beings have a choice, animals are completely at the mercy of the decisions human beings make for them. Human beings are not put down due to their injuries. Indeed, the owner ofSynchronised, one of the horses that were put down, said in his grief that he would not be entering the race again. Perhaps it is only when the loss is their own that each jockey will see the injustice of what they are involved in.

One thing that we can be assured of is that it won’t be easy to change the culture and attitude towards the Grand National. When money is involved, people are driven by gain, and the whole drink and dressing up culture that surrounds the race means it’s all about having a good time. Moreover, it will just be another tragic day recorded and forgotten about, until next year, when it happens again, and it will be recalled as a former statistic. Until we learn to value other things above lining our pockets, the yardstick for our moral values will never change.

 

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